Wednesday, February 9, 2011

Review of Booklife by Jeff VanderMeer

In Booklife, fantasy author and multitasker extraordinaire Jeff VanderMeer offers readers a special kind of book: a hard-hitting, no-nonsense guide to establishing, maintaining, and protecting a workable writing lifestyle, paired with a mega-dose of commiserative encouragement in the form of personal anecdotes, essays, and shared blueprints. VanderMeer has been around the publishing industry, in its many manifestations, long enough to be brimming with useful advice for authors climbing the ranks behind him. As a man who obviously knows how to think outside the box, he offers ideas that spur his readers to abandon the status quo in favor of a more daring, more rewarding adventure.


VanderMeer’s style of communication can only be described as generous. No arrogance, smugness, or cynicism to be navigated here. He comes across as a big brother, reaching down to help his less experienced siblings up a step on the ladder. In many ways, his reserved enthusiasm is worth the price of admission by itself. But VanderMeer offers much in the way of practicality as well, namely an incredibly thorough exploration of the “public booklife.” His suggestions span the gamut from formulating realistic goals and analyzing trends to establishing publicity platforms and navigating public relations.




He offers an intuitive and adamant model, in which he demands separation between public and private booklives, insisting that no author can work at full speed without separating the two very different sides of the writing coin. In stressing the need to routinely readjust the two booklives in a quest for balance, he also offers a wonderful set of chapters on building the private booklife to allow optimum creativity and productivity. He rounds off the book with a treasure trove of appendices, including his outline of “How to Write a Novel in Two Months.”
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9 comments:

  1. Except that he acts like an arrogant ass in his interactions with people on more than one occasion, leaving me personally turned off halfway through so that I never went back to this.

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  2. Really? That's entirely disappointing. One of the things that impressed me most about the book was his helpful and positive attitude.

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  3. And so this book is less of a, how to write, more of a promote a lifestyle of writing?

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  4. Right. It's about living an effective writing lifestyle more than anything, although it does offer some specific tips about writing.

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  5. Sounds like a different take than I've read before. I'll have to check it out.

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  6. Definitely a book I'd like to check out. I love the cover and I think it's important to read up on all things writerly and decide for myself if it's a good fit!!

    Thanks for sharing K.M.!

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  7. @India: Yes, it's definitely not your run-of-the-mill book for writers.

    @Jen: This book is very much about *finding* the right fit, in a lot of different areas, for each individual writer.

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  8. Can't speak for anonymous' experience, but in mine Jeff is the most generous, supportive person I've met in the writing business. I've seen him take time over and over to go out of his way to give advice, support and encouragement to new writers. Your impression of his book matches my experience of him as a person.

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  9. That's good to hear. Perhaps he was just having a bad day when the occurrence mentioned above happened.

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