Friday, August 14, 2015

The Art of Doing

I like reading books that are about improving your life. I think so many of those types of books can also apply to your business life. A book on friendships or self-improvement, for example, might have insights that you can use an author entrepreneur. One of those improvement types of books I read recently is The Art of Doing. There's some good concepts in there, and I found several things I wanted to share with you.

First, the book itself (written by Camille Sweeney and Josh Gosfield) is a wonderful collection of tips on how to do things well from people in a variety of areas, from celebrities to authors to lawyers to game show champs and everything you can imagine in-between. I personally liked this wide variety of perspectives. It showed the commonalities people had in achieving their dreams and goals (drive, determination) but also the unique way they each approached their specific areas of interest.

The information is goal-driven and I think authors can find a nugget or two to take with them to apply to their business. But in order for you to really get the benefits, you do have to think outside the box. The tips that someone may list apply to their industry and goals and while it will spill over into other areas of your life (authorpreneuership included) it won’t be a direct concept you can read and then immediately apply. It’s something you’ll need to ponder. If that’s a turn off to you, you might not get as much out of this book.

Many of these concepts are also things that really are intuitive, and for that reason you might not think they’re that groundbreaking on the surface. People want practical tips they can take away and this book didn’t have those. Instead, it cited things like drive and patience as critical skills in the art of the doing. I personally liked to be reminded of this but I do understand how some authors may think reading this won’t help them.

For instance, the authors said that "many of our participants cited patience as a critical skill. But their practice of patience took place over varying durations of time, from fractions of seconds in a competitive sport to days, months, years or even decades for other endeavors."

As an author (and artist) I could relate to this so well. Patience over different chunks of time to me means the patience that happens:

  • Over the years as I refine my writing skills
  • In minutes as I listen to a client’s needs
  • In weeks as I see a novel or book progress
  • In moments as I see people respond on social media.

Nothing in the writing life happens quickly (to me it seems that way, at least), but I related to this concept of patience. In sports, for example, patience means waiting a second for an opening if you're a running back. That second is crucial to giving you room to run up the field. Overall, I thought this was an excellent read that you could apply to many different areas of your life.

Cherie Burbach is a poet, mixed media artist, and freelance writer specializing in lifestyle and relationships. She's written for, NBC/Universal,, Christianity Today, and more. Her latest book is: How to (Really) Make Money BloggingVisit her website for more info,

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  1. I think patience is a lost virtue in this instant-gratification society. Some things, like hearing from an agent or editor, just take time and one has no other choice to be patient--or patiently impatient.

    1. Patiently impatient! that's a great way to put it

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