Monday, November 21, 2016

Almost There!

If you're participating in National Novel Writer's Month, then you're almost to your goal. Well, in days that is. Maybe you're ahead of schedule on your way to 50,000 words, or behind, but the good news is, there's still time.



One of the perks of being a member of www.nanowrimo.org is the pep talks given during November. Here are a few snippets from larger articles of wisdom and advice provided by some veteran writers.

"Sometimes, after I’ve taken my seat and made a cup of coffee but before I begin writing, I’ll make myself listen to a whole song. It can be any song, but what’s important is that you’re not doing anything but listening and maybe dancing a little or sipping your coffee—enjoying the moment. This allows you to settle in, transition from world to word, from the everyday mundane crap to the realm of creativity." Daniel Jose Older

Daniel José Older is the author of the Bone Street Rumba urban fantasy series, which begins with Half-Resurrection Blues.

 "What makes a writer a writer? Writing. A lot of people would say ‘talent’, but talent is really just the ability to do something well that most people have to work hard at. If you don’t think you have ‘talent’, just work hard instead—the talent often comes with a cost, anyway: a lack of good work habits. The talented ones often never had to learn to work hard; so many of them don’t finish their work because they never had to—it was enough to be talented, to offer people a glimpse of what you could be. So don’t be that person—don’t be the person that everyone believes could have done something. Be the person who tried." Alexander Chee

Alexander Chee is the author of the novels Edinburgh and The Queen of the NightHe is a contributing editor at The New Republic, and an editor at large at VQR.
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2 comments:

  1. Everyone could use a good pep talk!

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  2. Great quotes, Jody. I particularly like the one by Alexander Chee. Regret is a terrible thing. I don't want to die with any (that I had control over, at least), and I don't want to leave anyone behind with regrets about the way I handled any talent I have.

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