Monday, April 24, 2017

Newest News in Grammarland

Grammar Updates
(Really...it'll be fun)

 Product Details
Although the Associated Press, or AP style of writing reserved for journalists and other types of news writing such as court reporting and captioning, adapts/adopts new rules at least yearly based on current trends and pop culture, literary style of writing changes more slowly.

How many of you understood rules are different? If you read the news much—used to be paper, by the way/BTW—you see things like numerical references, fewer punctuation marks, even the single quote titles, sometimes even with italics, oh, the horror. (Case in point: the Poynter.com article title referenced below.)

I see people getting the two formats mixed up quite often. Literary style tends to spell more words, almost all numbers and even to the quarter time references. We do not use single quotations for anything, almost always, but for quotes within quotes, and we use the Oxford comma with reverence and respect. We have the space, we don’t have to cram our stories, front loaded with objectivity and precision, into ten inches of column space.

IF YOU ARE A JOURNALIST www.APStylebook.com is a good place to find the latest news, take pop quizzes, join twitterworld, partake of quizzes, converse with other nerds or the clueless, even read blogs.

The newest edition of the AP Stylebook will be released on July 11, 2017 (Grammar Girl say May 31 which may refer to the online version, I'm not sure). It’s available for pre-order on Amazon. Certain people, like the American Society of Copy Editors, got to see the previews and announced some of the changes on March 24. Along with a running header on the AP website, the following awesome sites highlighted the main changes for this year.


Although I mentioned in an earlier column that the American Dialect Society had made “their/them/they” singular in 2015, it was not formally adopted. Well it is now in certain situations—mostly because of the need for more gender neutral terminology, which is also clarified.

As you may guess, the electronic universe has caused some ripples regarding how much of it to use that won’t shorten our lifespan in reference. I don’t know how many of you recall listening painfully to broadcasters say “world wide web,” then, “www-dot” in front of urls. Now we hardly even bother with the www. Anyway, email is officially hyphen-less, as is esports. That one is rather confusing, but I assume those involved get it. It's not a misspelling of exports. You still use the hyphen for everything else e-whatever. I mention this specifically—email—because this spelling and one other have officially been accepted by the Chicago Manual of Style, the Bible for LITERARY WRITERS. Yup—if it’s a book, it’s LITERATURE, not a piece of JOURNALISM. Anyway, lower case “internet” is acceptable too in literary writing.

For those who belong to Scribd, you can access the 2016 AP Style guide here.


And of course, you can always check the Chicago Manual of Style website to ask questions in a forum and access abbreviated information from the manual. There is also a list of new Questions and Answers, like we don’t have to use a comma after etc., anymore (except in this case when it’s the closing word of a parenthetical phrase) here.
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