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Monday, August 21, 2017

Guest Post: How to Find Time For Creativity

You know how it goes. Keys in the door, shoes flung haphazardly into the entry way, and tired body plopped on the couch. You’ve got some writing to do, but one glance at your computer has you sighing in defeat. You have piles of homework, or work had to come home with you yet again, or your little ones gather around you, begging to be played with. Sometimes it’s even the business of writing that makes us put down the pen day after day—keeping up with social media pages, marketing, and responding to comments.

No matter what the particulars, it’s hard to be an author AND have a full-time life alongside it. But when it comes to the real heart of our writing, the thing that keeps us coming back to the grind day after day, how do we make time for that aspect? Today, I’m going to lay open three of the biggest time constraints busy authors face, and explore some ways that we can make time (during the time we do have to write) for that magical creativity of writing that all authors crave.

SOCIAL MEDIA

Social media is one of my biggest time constraints. I’ve found that the more I try to take on, the more sucked in I become. Before I know it, I’m spending hours of my writing time just checking my myriads of Facebook groups, or queuing up my Tumblr blog, or browsing my Twitter feed for the latest indie Kindle reads.

For me, I’m still trying to figure this out. I’m going to start eliminating social media sites that take up the most time and/or are not bringing any meaningful results or interactions. With what I’m left with, I’ll start culling the better sites and doubling down on those to try and reach out to my potential audience.

While social media is necessary for visibility and engagement, not all sites are created equal. Find where your particular genre audience likes to be the most, and focus the majority of your efforts there. By eliminating some of those self-imposed obligations, we enable ourselves to target our goals with a laser-like focus. And in doing so, we make more time for the actual creative work of writing.

REAL LIFE

Balancing real life and our growing businesses is a never-ending struggle. There are chores to be done, work to go to, social obligations to keep, children to be taken care of, classes to study for…and on top of that, we push ourselves to be at the top of our game in the authorial arena. I’d wager a guess that most of us don’t have a glorious amount of time to set aside for writing, if any. Some have to snatch 10 minutes here, 15 minutes there.

These minutes are precious, and it’s important to be disciplined with whatever time we do have. This is where being organized and knowing what needs doing comes into play. Try to make a daily or weekly list of the tasks you know need doing in regards to your writing. Then, when you find yourself with time, check that list and pick the most important thing to do.

If you have a set block of time, this gives you even more opportunities for streamlining your time. And if you are privileged enough to work from home, it pays to schedule certain tasks or certain projects on individual days when you know you’ll have the time for them. In being intentional and organized with our writing time, we can get more done in less time—and also have more time for real life, which leads to less stress and more enjoyment of the good things. (Note: This also contributes to garnering more ideas from our real-life experiences. When we’re running ourselves ragged, it’s hard to appreciate the beauty of the daily things.)

CONTENT CREATION

Creating quality content—for social media, blogs, and marketing campaigns— is a must for authors. But it can quickly become overwhelming when we look at our to-do list. Write a blog post that sparkles? Check. Make stunning graphics for Pinterest? Check. Come up with a genius poll for Facebook author page…and the list goes on and on.

If your brain isn’t spinning yet, maybe you’ve got this thing down pat already. But if it is (I know mine is!), there is a way to help minimize the time you spend coming up with great content that brings those valuable readers to your website or Amazon page. I call it “recycling content.” I’ve seen it used to great effect, especially with authors who have been creating content for a long time and have a stash of evergreen material that they can re-use.

Even if you don’t have the world’s biggest backlog of graphics, blog posts, or e-book freebies, you can still use this technique. For me, each time I sit down and write a blog post, I quickly create several different types of graphics for different social media sites. That way, I can post my graphics and a link to my post in many different places, expanding my reach without too much extra effort. This, in turn, gives me more time for creating the BIG quality content, my novels.

As much as we authors love writing, it does present its own set of challenges. Those challenges can become even more of a hurdle when we’re faced with the obligations of our business needs and day-to-day life. But with a few tweaks based on the time-management techniques and insights shared above, hopefully we can all find a better balance between life, the business of our writing, and the magic of writing—the art of putting pen to paper or fingers to keys and letting our ideas run wild.

How do you balance all these different elements in your own career? Feel free to share in the comments!

Aly Clark loves exploring deep, meaningful themes in her YA fiction books, and sharing her love for all things writing-related on her blog, alycatauthor.com. Her debut YA portal fantasy novel, Kingdom of the New Moon, is available on Amazon. When she’s not writing, you can find her singing, reading, bullet journaling, and drinking chai tea lattes.
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