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Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Wednesday Grammar Tip Capitalizing family names

Image result for capital letters

When to capitalize those family nicknames - you know, when Dad says, "Son, you've gone too far this time!" or daughter says, "Aw, Aunt Lulu would have let me..."

There is a trick to it. And it's easy!

Ask yourself:


  • Am I describing someone or using his or her proper name? Not substituting for a proper name, but actually using the name or title?
  • Am I using the relationship word (brother, bro, sis, uncle, grandma) as a NOUN?


Here are some examples.

My brother Dillon likes to give me knuckle rubs, but I hate it. Oh no, here he comes.
"Yo, bro," Dillon says to me and tries to grab my head.
At least Grandma comes to my rescue this time.
"Dillon, that's not nice," Grandma says to him. I just love my grandma.
Uncle Joe walks into the kitchen. My uncle is the nicest guy I know, not counting my dad.
"Son, take it easy on your little brother," Joe says.
Mom and Dad went on vacation, so Grandma, my aunt Babs, and uncle Joe are staying with me and Dillon.
It's just us boys, we don't have any sisters, though Aunt Babs has a sister who's a sister, like, a nun. Sister Joan.
"Your mother called," Grandma says. "She and your dad want to know how you're doing."

In the examples above, when Dillon is described as the brother, the usage is lower case. When Dillon talks to his younger brother, he uses the description, "bro," or "brother," so the usage is lower case.
When Grandma is first introduced, she's called by her proper title without a relationship identifier ("my") so the usage is uppercase. When "my" is in front of the description later, grandma is lower case. When Uncle Joe calls Dillon "Son," the only reason the word is capitalized is because it's at the beginning of the sentence; otherwise it would not be capitalized.

Questions? Comments?
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