Friday, November 17, 2017

Book Review of Memoir Miracle in My Living Room

Miracle in My Living Room: The story of a little Mann
Evelyn Mann
 Miracle In My Living Room: The Story of a Little Mann by [Mann, Evelyn]
Memoir
Her Purpose Press
c.2016
ISBN 9780998394404

Print: $12.95 Buy on Amazon
E-book: $2.99

From the publisher: In this inspirational story of hope, a first-time mom is faced with unthinkable circumstances. This was not the pregnancy any woman would have planned. This mom was forced to face the option of abortion while medical professionals said her son would never survive a day outside the womb. There were many harsh words used to describe her precious unborn child, including the devastating declaration “not compatible with life.”

Miracle in My Living Room chronicles a nearly 11-year journey for this mom who, when faced with absolutely no hope, found that there was ONLY hope.

My review: It’s hard not to sit back and feel guiltily grateful for only being violently sick during pregnancy after reading books like Mann’s memoir of her pregnancy and motherhood experience. Already in her late thirties when Evelyn and Ralph married, they wanted a family right away. Getting the welcome news of being pregnant was short-lived when a few months in, the first ultrasound showed issues, followed by a diagnosis of an extremely rare genetic condition. Evelyn was even discouraged from searching for more information about it, which she eventually ignored. The Manns chose to carry through with their pregnancy, searching for the right medical team and occasional heavenly intervention to help them. Samuel was always a real person in utero, through surgical birth and early months of love spent in hospitals and medical facilities. Evelyn and Ralph sacrificed their careers to watch over him, running interference through medical personnel when needed. They make it clear that while doctors, nurses, and aides for the most part did what they were taught to do, some were better at their specialties than others. While church and family gave unwavering support, questions still arose from their supporters and professionals about whether they were doing the right thing for their child. The Manns rightfully questioned themselves. Was Samuel in pain or too much distress? The special medical devices that kept him alive and in the most comfort were expensive and not always readily available. Constant supervision was critical for his care. Could they learn to care for him themselves at their own home?

Evelyn found other families touched by this condition and created a network of hope. Despite a “lethal” outlook, Samuel has lived over a decade, and their story offers inspiration.

My only complaint is about the treatment of editing. Numerous errors, even in the back cover copy, deflect a little from the book. Mostly typos which should have been caught before publication, perhaps a future edition would also correct naïve errors which work against the sincerity of the script.


About the author: Evelyn Mann is a stay-at-home mom who lives in Tampa Florida raising her special needs son, aka the “Miracle Mann.” Receiving inquiries from around the world, she offers other families hope and encouragement showing that a negative diagnosis is not beyond God’s reach.
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Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Nanowrimo Tips

Many writers are smack in the middle of National Novel Writer's Month - 50,000 words in 30 days. It seems a daunting task, but it's my 9th year to participate, and I love it. No, it's not a "submittable" project on the last day, but you have something to work with, which is better than nothing.

I usually start with an outline, but no matter how much I prepare, I get stuck. I'm tackling a historical fiction this time, a first for me, and so I did extensive research before November 1. Even with all that preparation I stumble over something that needs to be historically accurate, and I don't have the answer. I'm trying to remember to just focus on the story, and not get bogged down with questions. I jot down a note within my document so I know what I need to follow up on. I will lean heavily on my critique group later. They saved me from submitting something awhile back that had me stuffing my main character in the back seat of an El Camino. Yeah, I don't know anything about cars. The point is, the book was written. The bugs can get worked out later.

So...I tell myself:

1. Just keep writing.
2. Hook up with other Nano nuts for inspiration.
3. Take breaks. (I will put the work aside and watch a favorite program, jotting down words and phrases that catch my ear, and then go back to my project and try to incorporate them.)
4. Keep writing.
5. Remember that it's a draft, and you can write anything you want. Anything. Have fun.

Who's doing this with me? If you need an extra Nano Buddy, my handle is jodybooks. What's yours? Got any Nano tips?
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Friday, November 10, 2017

Domain-tenance

It started out innocently enough. All I wanted to do was switch hosts for my website because my computer, in all its glorious idiocy, suddenly wouldn't let me log out of my account with my Gmail address (where I do everything but my two blogs) and then sign in to my Yahoo account where my two blogs live. I spent an entire day doing everything to this computer other than tossing it off the balcony. Nothing worked.

I had no choice. I'd have to switch to a host that wouldn't require me to sign out and then sign in to another host to post on it, and then try to re-create my blogs on the second host. But in order to do that, I had to have a few questions answered. I asked a question and received a ticket at the new site. After several back and forth emails and a phone call, I finally figured out I'd have to have the old host point my domain to the new host's name servers. Of course, all this felt like pudding had been injected into my brain, but with the very friendly agent, I was able to initiate a website with them. All I had to do was contact the old host to tell them where they should point my domain in order to make my website live and able to be created.

Simple, huh? It might have been except the old host site is apparently manned by only a computer or maybe some talented monkeys. No humans, no place for a talk with an agent, nothing but a continual series of answers ("does this answer your question?") that almost, but not completely answer my questions. I asked for a ticket, but have yet to receive an email acknowledging that I'm even in the queue, so I'm in limbo until someone from the old site contacts me. I don't even know if I outright own the domain. Perhaps it's part of the old host and I'll have to pay for it forever, which is fine, but I have to know. In the meantime, I'm not able to start creating my new website until those darned domain thingies are pointed at the name servers.

My point (aside from a personal rant)? Please, please be careful when you choose a host for your website. There are attractive and free ones out there, and if your computer isn't as stubborn (dumb?) as mine, perhaps you'll never have a problem. But my advice is to talk to a human, if possible, then write down what they tell you about your domain (unless you bought it independently), because sure as shootin' you won't remember when you need to.

This might not be the best writing advice you've ever received, but it pays to ask other website owners how they like their hosts, the good and bad about them, and what they would do differently, if anything. I was naive and relied on only my limited knowledge of domains and websites, then went for the cheap fix to my problem. Yes, I got a website, and I liked it. But needs change, and technology advances daily (by the time this post goes live everything I've written above will no doubt be obsolete). As a result, I forgot important things that, had I written them down, wouldn't have left me in a holding pattern at the mercy of a computer or pack of talented monkeys. If ever I needed to talk to a human being, this is the time.

Even after I get all this needed information and get that domain pointed in the right direction, I still have to create the new website. I can feel the pudding now.
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Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Single Quotations – American English Literary style


Image result for image of quotation marks 
When do writers use single quotation marks?
 Lisa Lickel
  • In NON-Fiction AP style – that is, if you’re writing a newspaper article and the editor puts a title of a book or other such piece of work in the headline
  • In languages other than AMERICAN English – like, Queen’s or British-style
  • In quotes within quotes


Pay Attention, Authors!

If you’re writing an American English piece of literature no matter the style or genre or length, you only use a single quote mark when one of your characters is quoting something while speaking. Seriously. That’s it.

Please, I beg you, Horatio—nevermore use a single quotation mark by its little itty bitty self. There may be an exception, but just…really, don’t do it. Okay? 

If you’re using “air” quotes – double; if you’re using internal and feel like you have to use a mark – double; if you’re going for emphasis, gently, once in a very great while – italics.

Example:

Maude uncurled her long legs from the chair and pushed upward. “Honestly, Rupert, if I’d wanted to hear another method of movement, I would have called Helen. She’s always telling us to ‘get a wiggle on,’ or some such nonsense.”

Rupert guffawed. “Ha! Just the other day she told me to move my ‘blooming arse.’ Said she’d heard it in a movie.”


“Ye-es,” Maude drawled. “My Fair Lady. Elisa tries to show how refined she’s become until she attends a race and is about to lose a bet. She ‘shocks’ some of the ladies with her course language, though the ‘gentlemen’ get quite a kick.”
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